Today in Boxing History

On this date in Atlantic City Boxing History…

This Day In Atlantic City Boxing History – Kelly Pavlik vs. Sergio Martinez

Written by Rob Scott

Atlantic City — On April 17, 2010, Boardwalk Hall played host to 6,179 screaming fans as they witnessed Middleweight Championship history take place.

On this day  Bob Arum’s, Top Rank, Inc., along with Lou Dibella’s, Dibella Entertainment brought Kelly “The Ghost” Pavlik vs. Sergio “Maravilla” Martinez for the WBC/WBO Middleweight championships.

Champion vs. Champion

Kelly Pavlik, who came in sporting a 36-1 (32KOs) record, was making the 4th defense of his 160lb titles.

With a record of  44-2-2 (24KOs), Martinez walked into the ring as the reigning WBC 154lb champion but was playing the role of the challenger on this night.

Excitement vs. Excitement

Going into the bout, Pavlik’s only blemish was a unanimous decision loss to Bernard Hopkins in a non-title one bout trek into the light heavyweight division.

However, at the middleweight limit, it was a different story.

With noted knockout wins over former champion, Jermain Taylor, Edison Miranda, Marco Antonio Rubio, to name a few, the Youngstown, OH native had developed a knockout middleweight reputation.

Martinez was making a return to AC, having just come off of a heated majority decision loss just four months earlier to the volume punching, Paul Williams,  at Boardwalk Hall’s Adrian Phillips Theater.

The excitement brought in his bout with Williams was a precursor to what Martinez would bring against Pavlik.

Expect The Unexpected

Both fighters came to fight on this evening, but it was Martinez who stepped up to the challenge and wouldn’t be denied.

From the start, Martinez put forth an awkward style that offset and caused problems for Pavlik. The Argentinean’s speed, movement, and all-around ring generalship made it hard for Pavlik to land his power shots, while a cut left eyebrow sustained in the first round only added to the hill climb that Pavlik would endure.

Pavlik scored a flash knockdown in round seven, mostly caused by both fighters getting their feet tied-up, but it was Martinez who still had control.

Moving and potshotting the defending champion throughout, by round nine the wound over Pavlik’s eye served as a target for Martinez, eventually opening up and bleeding profusely.

With blood flowing, it made it even harder for Pavlik who found it increasingly harder to see punches coming.

And The New Middleweight Champion

Throughout this point, Pavlik was still a very dangerous fighter, but Martinez’s corner eventually saw a wounded man in the defending champ and instructed their fighter to go in for the kill. However the tough Pavlik persevered and lasted the entire fight with the decision being a foregone conclusion

With scores of 112-115, 111-115 and 111-116, Martinez was declared the winner and new WBC/WBO Middleweight Champion.

In the post-fight interviews, Pavlik admitted that it was Martinez’s hand and foot speed that was the deciding factor in his loss. Not being able to catch Martinez with any meaningful shots to slow him down played a significant role in this title loss as well.

 

Another Great Boxing Night In AC

You win some, you lose some, but on this night, like so many others before and after, served as yet another great night for Atlantic City Boxing History.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

Remembering A Boxing Fixture: Artie Curry

Written by Rob Scott

Photo by Holger Keifel and Rob Scott

Still In Our Hearts and Minds

Seek and you shall find? Well, you will be hard-pressed to find a person in the sport that had the reputation and reverence as Arthur Curry.

Champions come in many forms, but when it comes to boxing, many only think of in-ring prowess. To those who know the behind the scene preparations and presences in the sport, you know that Artie was a larger than life guy who’s presence indeed was larger than life and packed its own punch.

From the mailroom of Time Warner to holding the official position at HBO of, “Manager of HBO Sports Talent Relations,” Artie Curry’s duties were to act as a liaison between the network and the various fighters that were signed. The position was one that had a hand and glove type of fit because Artie related to so many.  His reputation with the network and its fighters mirrored one another, with Artie being trusted and admired by both.

HBO and the sport of boxing lost a Champion nine years ago, but because of all who he touched, every bit like Ali, Louis, Robinson, Gatti, etc, Artie’s legacy still…and forever lives on.

The Atlantic City Boxing Hall Of Fame acknowledges the life and contributions of Mr. Arthur Curry…A Champion Forever.

 

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

ACBHOF Wishes a Happy Birthday To 2018 Inductee, “Merciless” Ray Mercer

Written by Rob Scott

 

The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame gives a special birthday wish to  “Merciless” Ray Mercer.

1988 Olympic Heavyweight Gold Medalist

Former NABF Heavyweight Champion

Former IBF Inter-Continental Champion

Former WBO Heavyweight Champion

2018 ACBHOF Inductee

 

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Ray Mercer vs. Larry Holmes

Written by Rob Scott

When Future Inductees Intersect

Atlantic City — February 7, 1992 — On this day, Bob Arum’s, Top Rank, Inc., brought to Atlantic City’s Convention Center, “The Last Stand: Power vs. Pride” – Ray Mercer vs. Larry Holmes.

Up Against the Odds

A capacity crowd filled the arena on this evening to witness Larry Holmes, a former heavyweight champion of the world who held on to that title for an impressive 7 1/2 years, attempt to beat the odds by beating the undefeated, hard-hitting and twelve years younger 1988 Olympic Gold Medalist, “Merciless” Ray Mercer.

Mercer vs. Holmes

Mercer, a former WBO Heavyweight Champion, was coming off of a crushing 5th round KO victory over Tommy Morrison in the very same AC ring just over 3 1/2 months earlier.

The 42-year-old, Holmes, was riding off of a five victory win streak, but last stepped into the ring against top opposition about four years earlier, a 4th round KO loss to then Undisputed Heavyweight Champion, Mike Tyson.

Swinging Towards the Unexpected

Not needing to teach the old dog new tricks, Holmes, in fact, became the teacher on this night, outsmarting Mercer who was installed as a 4-1 favorite to send Holmes into permanent retirement.

After getting rocked in the first round, Holmes regained his faculties and began to land more frequently, and at times, played with his younger opponent. He talked to Mercer and the crowd, particularly in the 6th when he shouted: “I’m not Tommy Morrison.”

In the first moments of the 7th round, a frustrated Mercer landed an elbow to the head of Holmes, but the veteran kept his composure and fought back, landing 40 punches to Mercer’s 17 in that round.

Looking more tired than his older opponent, Mercer still was dangerous though, landing periodic shots, but not enough to outwork and outpoint the old warhorse

The Final Bell

When the final bell rang and the scores were read, Holmes was declared the winner by unanimous decision with scores of 117–112, 117–111 and 115–113. Contrary to when he entered the ring, Holmes received roaring cheers as the Atlantic City crowd and those watching on pay-per-view appreciated the effort put in on this night by the man known as the “Easton Assasin.”

Larry Holmes was voted into the Atlantic City Boxing Hall Of Fame in its inaugural class in 2017 along with referee, Steve Smoger, and NJ State Athletic Control Board Commissioner, Larry Hazzard. This year’s class will see, promoter, Bob Arum and Ray Mercer enter the ACBHOF’s 2018 class.

Catch a Glimpse of History

All these men have made boxing history; On this night in 1992 – All had made Atlantic City Boxing History.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have, you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Hector Camacho vs. Vinny Pazienza

Written by Rob Scott

The Camacho vs. Pazienza Grudge Match

Atlantic City — February 3, 1990 — On this day, Kathy Duva’s Main Events Inc., along with Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino, brought us “Put Up Or Shut Up” – Hector “Macho Man” Camacho vs. Vinny “The Pazmanian Devil” Pazienza for the WBO World Jr. Welterweight Championship.

Atlantic City’s old Convention Center played host to this grudge match, which turned out to be a very good fight.

The Current and Former Champions Battle It Out

The three-time world champion, Camacho, who sported a 38-0 (17KOs) record at the time, was making the first defense of his WBO 140lb crown. Pazienza, a former IBF world lightweight champion himself, came into the ring on this night with a record of 28-3 (23KOs).

Camacho vs. Paz

Tempers and tensions flared as both fighters came in determined to get the win on this night, but it was Camacho who showed poise and fluidity, counter punching and outboxing the aggressive Pazienza over the long haul.

Multiple cuts to Pazienza’s face, particularly a gash over his left eye in the tenth, helped hampered his performance, causing frustration and an eventual eleventh round point deduction from the referee, Tony Perez.

Let the Best Boxer Win

Camacho walked away with the twelve round unanimous decision win by scores of 116-117, 112-115 and 109-119.

Also on the card, Pernell “SweetPea” Whitaker successfully defended his IBF/WBC Lightweight titles with a twelve round unanimous decision over Freddie Pendleton. The Norfolk, Va native won by scores of 116-112 twice and 117-113.

Michael Moorer successfully made the seventh defense of his WBO Light heavyweight championship when he stopped Marcellus Allen after the ninth round. Marcellus never answered the bell for the tenth round.

Another Fight Night in the AC Books

All-in-all it was a great night of fights and a great addition to the Atlantic City record books.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Diego Corrales Makes His Only Appearance in an AC Boxing Ring.

Written by Rob Scott
Photographs by Rob Scott

Five Bout Card Featuring the Return of Corrales

Atlantic City –  January 25, 2003 –  On this date Gary Shaw Productions, along with Ballys Park Place Hotel Casino and Showtime television, brought to Atlantic City a five bout card headlined by Sharmba Mitchell vs. Carlos Wilfredo Vilches, but also featured the return of the blood and guts warrior, Diego “Chico” Corrales.

2018-01-25_08-15-10

A Long-Awaited Reappearance

Corrales, 33-1 (27KOs), took on Michael Davis, 23-13 (9KOs), in what was his first appearance in a boxing ring in just over two years. It was also his very first bout since his heart breaking tenth round TKO loss to Floyd Mayweather in 2001.

Back in a Major Way

Overcoming in and out of ring setbacks, Corrales got right back in the ring and scored an exciting fifth round TKO for the people watching live in the Ballys Ballroom, as well as the Showtime viewing audience.

The main event for the evening saw Sharmba Mitchell, 50-3 (28KOs), make quick work of Carlos Wilfredo Vilches, 38-2-2 (24KOs), scoring a second round TKO in a bout that was scheduled for twelve. The bout was an IBF eliminator to determine the #2 contender for their 140lb belt.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – “Sugar” Ray Leonard vs. Hector “Macho” Camacho

Written by Rob Scott

Sugar Ray Leonard’s Last Bout

Atlantic City – On March 1, 1997, “Sugar” Ray Leonard attempted to once again defy the odds and again step into the ring to compete.

Camacho vs. Leonard

Having once returned to the ring after a three year absence to face, and beat, reigning Undisputed Middleweight Champion, “Marvelous” Marvin Hagler, the now forty year old Leonard faced off with Hector “Macho” Camacho for Camacho’s IBC Middleweight championship at Atlantic City’s Convention Center. It was a return, this time after a six year hiatus from ring competition.

“Macho” Camacho Steps up Against the Odds

Leonard was a 7 to 5 favorite to win the fight, but Camacho changed the show from sweet as sugar to Macho Time, knocking Leonard down in the fifth round, then battering him when he got to his feet and the fight commenced. Referee Joe Cortez stopped the assault at the 1:08 mark into the round.  It would be Leonard’s very last match.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Arturo Gatti vs. Gianluca Branco

Written by Rob Scott
Photographs by Rob Scott

Thunder on the Boardwalk

Atlantic City – On this night, Main Events Inc, once again brought their blood and guts warrior, Arturo “Thunder” Gatti, to Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall.

Arturo Gatti vs. Gianluca Branco

Gatti, who had made The Hall his second home, looked to capture his second world title when he faced the tough undefeated Italian, Gianluca Branco, for the vacant WBC World Super lightweight championship.

Good, Good, Great

Gatti used movement and a good jab to outbox his opponent over the first nine rounds, with Branco continuing to come forward and landing some of his own decent shots at times. However, a nice Gatti left hook dropped Branco with 37 seconds left in the tenth round to make a knockout necessary for Branco to pull off an upset.

Branco survived the round and the fight, but the knockout never came. Gatti earned a unanimous twelve round decision and was declared the new WBC Champion.

More Excitement That Night

Also on the card was rising star, Francisco Bojado who faced Emmanuel Clottey in a super lightweight showdown.

Bojado walked away with a ten round unanimous decision, but the highlight was after the fight when Bojado was walking back to his dressing room.

Paulie Malignaggi gave us a glimpse of his gift of gab by goading Bojado into a heated argument and staredown which had to be broken up by Bojado’s trainer, Floyd Mayweather Sr. and surrounding security. Unfortunately, this match-up never materialized.

Also, gaining victories on this night was Kermit Cintron, who scored a fifth round TKO stoppage of  Humberto Aranda, and  James McGirt Jr., Son of former two division world champion,  James “Buddy” McGirt. It was the younger McGirt’s professional debut.

In the audience enjoying the night of fights were former greats, “Gentleman” Gerry Cooney and Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Mike Tyson vs. Larry Holmes

Written by Rob Scott

Atlantic City — January 22, 1988 — On this day in Atlantic City boxing history, Don King Productions, along with Trump Plaza brought Mike Tyson and Larry Holmes together in a battle for the Undisputed Heavyweight Championship Of The World.

The Atlantic City Convention Center played host to this match-up of a great former champion trying to turn back the hands of time, against a current champion who many were saying greatness was inevitable.

Tyson vs. Holmes

Experience Takes on Youth

The thirty-eight-year-old Holmes, whose last bout was an unsuccessful attempt to regain the IBF/lineal heavyweight championship from Michael Spinks some twenty-one months earlier, looked to take his ring experience into the ring against Tyson who was a young twenty-one years of age at the time.

In the end, youth prevailed over experience as Tyson scored three knockdowns in the fourth round with the referee, Joe Cortez, calling a halt to the bout with five seconds remaining in the round.

This marked the first time Holmes had been knocked out in his career

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History: Riddick Bowe vs. Andrew Golota 2

Written by Rob Scott

Fighting off a Repeat

Atlantic City – December 14, 1996 – On this date, Main Events Inc., Caesars Atlantic City and the Atlantic City Convention Center brought us Riddick Bowe vs. Andrew Golota II.

It was a rematch of their first meeting that took place in New York’s Madison Square Garden on July 11, 1996.

The first fight made sports headlines after a huge brawl broke out in the ring, which resulted in fights in several parts of the arena.

The Final Straw

Tempers swelled after Golota was disqualified for landing multiple low blows throughout the contest.

Golota was penalized points in the fourth, sixth and seventh rounds which dropped Bowe to the ground in pain, but it was yet another low blow in the seventh that sent Bowe to the canvas in pain for the final time.

The referee, Wayne Kelly, had given leeway, but had seen enough, and decided to call an end to the bout in the seventh.

All Eyes on the Rematch

The resulting brawl was indeed that proverbial black eye on the sport, but it also made the rematch that much more of a curious attraction.

Bowe vs. Golota II

With Atlantic City set as a new venue, new expectations for the rematch were set.

Bowe, who entered the ring weighing 252lbs, seemingly over-trained for the rematch, coming into the ring weighing a thin looking 235lbs.

Golota, who tipped the scale at 243lbs for the first fight, weighed in at 239lbs for the rematch.

Cheap Shots Again

In their second outing, Golota was definitely making an account of himself, even dropping Bowe in the second round. But in that very same round, Golota chose to resort to unsportsmanlike behavior yet again.

As a result of his own intentional head butt in the second round, Golota opened up a cut over his own left eye, which resulted in the referee, Eddie Cotton, deducting a point from Golota himself for the foul.

The third round went to Bowe and a fourth round rally dropped Golota in the round’s opening stanza. Unfortunately for Golota, later in the fourth, yet another point was taken as a result of a low blow that dropped Bowe and caused a delay in that round.

In between rounds four and five, Golota’s corner implored him to not throw any more body shots, explaining that Bowe was a faded fighter.

Golota Regains Control

While both looked tired at the start of the fifth, Golota again was able to drop an even more exhausted Bowe and battered the former heavyweight champion throughout the round.

Even with a cut eye and mouth, Golota thoroughly dominated round six, seven and eight, landing vicious shots to Bowe’s head.

In the ninth round, Golota seemingly threw away the fight when he landed yet another very low blow in a round he was again winning.

Calling it Quits

After this final below the belt shot, the referee had seen enough and immediately called a halt to the bout at the 2:58 mark of round nine.

The disqualification win again preserved Bowe’s record, but set off red flags when the post fight interview found him slurring in a manner that was blamed on the amount of blows Bowe had taken in his career.

In another bout on the card, Ray Mercer won a unanimous ten round decision against Tim Witherspoon.

With nine bouts in all, the card definitely went down as one for the record books.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.