Today in Boxing History

On this date in Atlantic City Boxing History…

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Hector Camacho vs. Vinny Pazienza

Written by Rob Scott

The Camacho vs. Pazienza Grudge Match

Atlantic City — February 3, 1990 — On this day, Kathy Duva’s Main Events Inc., along with Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino, brought us “Put Up Or Shut Up” – Hector “Macho Man” Camacho vs. Vinny “The Pazmanian Devil” Pazienza for the WBO World Jr. Welterweight Championship.

Atlantic City’s old Convention Center played host to this grudge match, which turned out to be a very good fight.

The Current and Former Champions Battle It Out

The three-time world champion, Camacho, who sported a 38-0 (17KOs) record at the time, was making the first defense of his WBO 140lb crown. Pazienza, a former IBF world lightweight champion himself, came into the ring on this night with a record of 28-3 (23KOs).

Camacho vs. Paz

Tempers and tensions flared as both fighters came in determined to get the win on this night, but it was Camacho who showed poise and fluidity, counter punching and outboxing the aggressive Pazienza over the long haul.

Multiple cuts to Pazienza’s face, particularly a gash over his left eye in the tenth, helped hampered his performance, causing frustration and an eventual eleventh round point deduction from the referee, Tony Perez.

Let the Best Boxer Win

Camacho walked away with the twelve round unanimous decision win by scores of 116-117, 112-115 and 109-119.

Also on the card, Pernell “SweetPea” Whitaker successfully defended his IBF/WBC Lightweight titles with a twelve round unanimous decision over Freddie Pendleton. The Norfolk, Va native won by scores of 116-112 twice and 117-113.

Michael Moorer successfully made the seventh defense of his WBO Light heavyweight championship when he stopped Marcellus Allen after the ninth round. Marcellus never answered the bell for the tenth round.

Another Fight Night in the AC Books

All-in-all it was a great night of fights and a great addition to the Atlantic City record books.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Diego Corrales Makes His Only Appearance in an AC Boxing Ring.

Written by Rob Scott
Photographs by Rob Scott

Five Bout Card Featuring the Return of Corrales

Atlantic City –  January 25, 2003 –  On this date Gary Shaw Productions, along with Ballys Park Place Hotel Casino and Showtime television, brought to Atlantic City a five bout card headlined by Sharmba Mitchell vs. Carlos Wilfredo Vilches, but also featured the return of the blood and guts warrior, Diego “Chico” Corrales.

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A Long-Awaited Reappearance

Corrales, 33-1 (27KOs), took on Michael Davis, 23-13 (9KOs), in what was his first appearance in a boxing ring in just over two years. It was also his very first bout since his heart breaking tenth round TKO loss to Floyd Mayweather in 2001.

Back in a Major Way

Overcoming in and out of ring setbacks, Corrales got right back in the ring and scored an exciting fifth round TKO for the people watching live in the Ballys Ballroom, as well as the Showtime viewing audience.

The main event for the evening saw Sharmba Mitchell, 50-3 (28KOs), make quick work of Carlos Wilfredo Vilches, 38-2-2 (24KOs), scoring a second round TKO in a bout that was scheduled for twelve. The bout was an IBF eliminator to determine the #2 contender for their 140lb belt.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Roy Jones Jr. vs. Montell Griffin

Written by Rob Scott

The 1997 WBC Light Heavyweight Championship

Atlantic City – (March 21, 1997) –  On this day, Square Ring, Inc. and Trump Taj Mahal brought together Roy Jones Jr. vs. Montell Griffin for the WBC Light heavyweight championship.

Griffin vs. Jones Jr. Poster

After defeating Mike McCallum for the interim belt in November, Jones was elevated to full champion and was making his very first defense.

Only One Fighter Leaves Perfect

Both champion and challenger entered the ring as undefeated fighters, with Jones sporting a 34-0 (29KOs) record, while Griffin’s record was an impressive 26-0 (18KOs).

Jones hit Griffin after taking a knee, resulting in referee, Tony Perez, declaring Griffin the winner by disqualification after he was unable to continue.

A New Champion

It made Griffin the new champion, and resulted in the first record loss in Jones’ professional career.

It was a controversial ending, but it was yet another exciting night at the fights in Atlantic City boxing history.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – “Sugar” Ray Leonard vs. Hector “Macho” Camacho

Written by Rob Scott

Sugar Ray Leonard’s Last Bout

Atlantic City – On March 1, 1997, “Sugar” Ray Leonard attempted to once again defy the odds and again step into the ring to compete.

Camacho vs. Leonard

Having once returned to the ring after a three year absence to face, and beat, reigning Undisputed Middleweight Champion, “Marvelous” Marvin Hagler, the now forty year old Leonard faced off with Hector “Macho” Camacho for Camacho’s IBC Middleweight championship at Atlantic City’s Convention Center. It was a return, this time after a six year hiatus from ring competition.

“Macho” Camacho Steps up Against the Odds

Leonard was a 7 to 5 favorite to win the fight, but Camacho changed the show from sweet as sugar to Macho Time, knocking Leonard down in the fifth round, then battering him when he got to his feet and the fight commenced. Referee Joe Cortez stopped the assault at the 1:08 mark into the round.  It would be Leonard’s very last match.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Roberto Duran vs. Iran Barkley

Written by Rob Scott

Steel vs. Stone for the WBC Middleweight Championship

Atlantic City – On this night, Top Rank Inc., along with Trump Plaza brought  the fight fans “Steel vs. Stone” – Iran Barkley vs. Roberto Duran for the WBC Middleweight Championship  to Atlantic City’s Convention  Center.

Duran vs. Barkley

Barkley, making the first defense of his title that he won eight months earlier with a spectacular third round stoppage of The “Hit Man” Thomas Hearns, was set as a 2 1/2 to 1 favorite to beat the Panamanian legend.

Up Against It

The main reason for odds was not only their nine year age differential and Duran’s reputation for not taking care of himself between fights, but also because of the sensational second round knockout Duran suffered at the hands Hearns some years before.

Duran vs. Barkley Stats

The younger, stronger and seemingly better conditioned Barkley took it to the aging ring vet early, but as the fight went on it was Barkley who was forced to fight with the handicap of a very swollen eye and Duran’s resilience.

Duran took the best that Barkley came with, even making him miss quite a few shots. Over time, the haul Barkley had to endure became a long one, with he himself wearing down.

One Blow Changes Everything

While the fight was still in many ways up in the air, in the eleventh round Duran made a separation, landing a combination that dropped the defending champion for a six count.

That knockdown had Barkley still trying to gather his senses at the bell, with him having problems finding his corner.

The fight eventually went the distance with Duran being awarded a split decision victory on scores of 118-112, 116-112 and 113-116.

The victory made Duran a four division world champion and while his greatness was already solidified, this victory added icing.

Duran Victory

All-in-all, It was a great night for the legendary “Hands Of Stone” –  but an even better night for Atlantic City boxing history.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Arturo Gatti vs. Gianluca Branco

Written by Rob Scott
Photographs by Rob Scott

Thunder on the Boardwalk

Atlantic City – On this night, Main Events Inc, once again brought their blood and guts warrior, Arturo “Thunder” Gatti, to Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall.

Arturo Gatti vs. Gianluca Branco

Gatti, who had made The Hall his second home, looked to capture his second world title when he faced the tough undefeated Italian, Gianluca Branco, for the vacant WBC World Super lightweight championship.

Good, Good, Great

Gatti used movement and a good jab to outbox his opponent over the first nine rounds, with Branco continuing to come forward and landing some of his own decent shots at times. However, a nice Gatti left hook dropped Branco with 37 seconds left in the tenth round to make a knockout necessary for Branco to pull off an upset.

Branco survived the round and the fight, but the knockout never came. Gatti earned a unanimous twelve round decision and was declared the new WBC Champion.

More Excitement That Night

Also on the card was rising star, Francisco Bojado who faced Emmanuel Clottey in a super lightweight showdown.

Bojado walked away with a ten round unanimous decision, but the highlight was after the fight when Bojado was walking back to his dressing room.

Paulie Malignaggi gave us a glimpse of his gift of gab by goading Bojado into a heated argument and staredown which had to be broken up by Bojado’s trainer, Floyd Mayweather Sr. and surrounding security. Unfortunately, this match-up never materialized.

Also, gaining victories on this night was Kermit Cintron, who scored a fifth round TKO stoppage of  Humberto Aranda, and  James McGirt Jr., Son of former two division world champion,  James “Buddy” McGirt. It was the younger McGirt’s professional debut.

In the audience enjoying the night of fights were former greats, “Gentleman” Gerry Cooney and Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History – Mike Tyson vs. Larry Holmes

Written by Rob Scott

Heavyweight History from 1988

Atlantic City — January 22, 1988 — On this day in Atlantic City boxing history, Don King Productions, along with Trump Plaza brought Mike Tyson and Larry Holmes together in a battle for the Undisputed Heavyweight Championship Of The World.

Tyson vs. Holmes

The Atlantic City Convention Center played host to this match-up of a great former champion trying to turn back the hands of time, against a current champion who many were saying greatness was inevitable.

Experience Takes on Youth

The thirty-eight-year-old Holmes, who’s last bout was an unsuccessful attempt to regain the IBF/lineal heavyweight championship from Michael Spinks some twenty-one months earlier, looked to take his ring experience into the ring against Tyson who was a young twenty-one years of age at the time.

In the end, youth prevailed over experience as Tyson scored three knockdowns in the fourth round with the referee, Joe Cortez, calling a halt to the fight with five seconds remaining in the round.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History: Riddick Bowe vs. Andrew Golota 2

Written by Rob Scott

Fighting off a Repeat

Atlantic City – December 14, 1996 – On this date, Main Events Inc., Caesars Atlantic City and the Atlantic City Convention Center brought us Riddick Bowe vs. Andrew Golota II.

It was a rematch of their first meeting that took place in New York’s Madison Square Garden on July 11, 1996.

The first fight made sports headlines after a huge brawl broke out in the ring, which resulted in fights in several parts of the arena.

The Final Straw

Tempers swelled after Golota was disqualified for landing multiple low blows throughout the contest.

Golota was penalized points in the fourth, sixth and seventh rounds which dropped Bowe to the ground in pain, but it was yet another low blow in the seventh that sent Bowe to the canvas in pain for the final time.

The referee, Wayne Kelly, had given leeway, but had seen enough, and decided to call an end to the bout in the seventh.

All Eyes on the Rematch

The resulting brawl was indeed that proverbial black eye on the sport, but it also made the rematch that much more of a curious attraction.

Bowe vs. Golota II

With Atlantic City set as a new venue, new expectations for the rematch were set.

Bowe, who entered the ring weighing 252lbs, seemingly over-trained for the rematch, coming into the ring weighing a thin looking 235lbs.

Golota, who tipped the scale at 243lbs for the first fight, weighed in at 239lbs for the rematch.

Cheap Shots Again

In their second outing, Golota was definitely making an account of himself, even dropping Bowe in the second round. But in that very same round, Golota chose to resort to unsportsmanlike behavior yet again.

As a result of his own intentional head butt in the second round, Golota opened up a cut over his own left eye, which resulted in the referee, Eddie Cotton, deducting a point from Golota himself for the foul.

The third round went to Bowe and a fourth round rally dropped Golota in the round’s opening stanza. Unfortunately for Golota, later in the fourth, yet another point was taken as a result of a low blow that dropped Bowe and caused a delay in that round.

In between rounds four and five, Golota’s corner implored him to not throw any more body shots, explaining that Bowe was a faded fighter.

Golota Regains Control

While both looked tired at the start of the fifth, Golota again was able to drop an even more exhausted Bowe and battered the former heavyweight champion throughout the round.

Even with a cut eye and mouth, Golota thoroughly dominated round six, seven and eight, landing vicious shots to Bowe’s head.

In the ninth round, Golota seemingly threw away the fight when he landed yet another very low blow in a round he was again winning.

Calling it Quits

After this final below the belt shot, the referee had seen enough and immediately called a halt to the bout at the 2:58 mark of round nine.

The disqualification win again preserved Bowe’s record, but set off red flags when the post fight interview found him slurring in a manner that was blamed on the amount of blows Bowe had taken in his career.

In another bout on the card, Ray Mercer won a unanimous ten round decision against Tim Witherspoon.

With nine bouts in all, the card definitely went down as one for the record books.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.

This Day in Atlantic City Boxing History: James Toney vs. Mike Mccallum

Written by Rob Scott

World Middleweight Title Decided in Atlantic City

Atlantic City – December 13, 1991 – On this night Bob Arum’s Top Rank Inc., Trump Plaza and Atlantic City’s Convention Hall brought a world middleweight title match-up to town when IBF World champion,  James “Lights out” Toney, faced off with Mike “The Body Snatcher” McCallum.

Toney vs. McCallum

The bout was initially billed as a unification contest, but McCallum was stripped of his WBA world title earlier in the month for refusing to face the WBA’s mandatory challenger, opting instead to face Toney.

An Even Match to Start the Rivalry

The crowd on hand saw the younger Toney battle the slick McCallum to a draw, with two judges scoring for each, but the third judge seeing it even.

It was the first of three meetings between these two warriors, with Toney, who had a twelve year age advantage, pulling out the wins in their future bouts.

“The Executioner” and More Round Out the Night

Also on this card, Charles Murray scored a ten round unanimous decision over former WBA World Lightweight champion, Livingston Bramble, in a 140lb match-up.

In his sixteenth professional fight,  future great, Bernard “The Executioner” Hopkins, won a ten round unanimous decision over Willie Kemp in a super middleweight contest.

Riddick Bowe faced Elijah Tillery in a rematch of their initial bout that took place less than two months earlier in Washington, DC.

The first bout ended with Bowe winning by disqualification after the first round as a result of a melee that broke out. The brawl saw Tillery landing a few kicks, then Bowes manager, Rock Newman, pull Tillery over the top rope and out of the ring. The aforementioned headlines served as more than enough promotion to create curiosity about the return match-up.

A powerful Bowe right hand started a barrage, followed by a strong right uppercut, to cause the referee to administer a standing eight count in the fourth round. While giving the eight count, the referee called a halt to the fight after Tillery, bleeding profusely from his nose, chose to not continue. Bowe was awarded a fourth round TKO victory.

Disclaimer: All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame is not liable for any errors or omissions in this information. Any opinions or inquiries that you may have you can forward them to Rob Scott at robscottxl@msn.com.